Crimson and Cream are Green

Crimson and Cream are Green

With the onslot of students moving into Indiana University for the beginning of another year, I had a chance to examine if the campus was doing their part to be sustainable to the community at large. The campus does recycle all aluminum, glass, plastic 1-7, paper, news print, and cardboard. In fact, every dormitory and classroom building has recycle bins for the co-mingling of these items. Particularly on move-in day, each dorm has a cardboard dumpster large enough to take all the cardboard for the entire week. They further educate all students with an all-dorm floor meeting to inform the residents of all opportunities that each person can take to ensure the 3R’s – recycle, reuse, reduce! Other examples are in the food services areas of Wright, Foster, and Read Quads. Here the students are informed by use of a large information center at the point-of-disposal on how to sort their plate and utensil waste into recycle bins. Within the dorm rooms of Wright Quad, each resident has a restricted showerhead, faucet and toilet power flusher to help increase water efficiency. Each room has flourescent lighting and blinds to help control the use of energy. Also, each student can choose to purchase a water bottle and the water refills are free! No redundant purchase of plastic bottles. The IU campus has developed a great transit system. Any person can ride the IU bus system at no cost and the Bloomington bus transit is free to students with their ID. The endless bike racks and persons walking is very evident on any given day as well. They also provide bike lanes on most campus roads. All are a great way to save energy and promote individual health. And, with OnCourse, the IU website, the university has tried to become more paperless. Here are posted all assignments, class syllabi, lecture slides, grades and handouts. All important ways to conserve energy and materials. Not to mention that students can return books for cash or drop off to a recycle bin, if unable to return for cash. But the quest to be green does not stop on the campus. With some students choosing to live in off-campus apartments or homes, there is still the need to be considerate of potential waste. As furnishings go, a student has the option of renting their furniture or, if they are leaving an apartment, they can sell to the next student that is moving in. This is a great solution for the ever changing campus. But is there room for more greening? Always, and the IU campus might be interesting in hearing more. Do you have any suggestions to pass on to IU? Submitted by: Julie Knight

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