Trends & “Boomers”

Trends & “Boomers”

I recently received an e-mail from Nancy Ramsey, Sr. Market Manager of Herman Miller, who shared a very interesting link global trends: . The authors, Tracey Keys and Thomas W. Malnight, wrote about the new global trends in North America. During their research, they identified what they believed to be the ten most critical trends “on most executives’ watch list” within the near future. Not listed in any order of importance, they are as follows: 1. The mobile time machine 2. Potential for crises in water, food and electricity 3. The global technology race 4. Competing in the BRIC (*) – and beyond 5. Growing influence of “we and me” not just “they” 6. The rise of new power brokers 7. Interdependence and competition across industries, not just within 8. Fight to own the new consumer 9. Generational gaps 10. Tensions of globalization AND fragmentation

  • In economics, BRIC is a grouping acronym that refers to the countries of Brazil, Russia, India and China, which are all deemed to be at a similar stage of newly advanced economic development. It is alternatively classified as the “Big Four”.

For specific details on each of the ten trends listed above, please refer to the link and you’ll see the authors’ comprehensive definition of each trend – summarized in a paragraph. Although all ten trends appear to be just as important as the other, one fascinates me more or sticks out above the others … and that is: #9 – Generational gaps. I am intrigued because as a “Baby Boomer” from the 50’s, I am now working along side three other generations in the workforce (i.e., Veterans, Gen X and Gen Y). Depending on which resource book or reference website you look at, there are many variations of the generation years’ groupings or break-out … so for ease sake, I’ll use this grouping: 1922-1945 = Veterans, Traditionalists, GI’s; 1946-1964 = Baby Boom, The Boomers; 1965-1980 = Generation X, Gen Xers; 1981-2000 = Generation Y, Gen Y, Millennial, Internet Generation. Why the fascination about Trend #9 you ask … well because the impact these different generations bring to a company’s work style, is noteworthy. Managing and motivating a Baby Boomer can and usually is completely different than managing and motivating a Gen Y individual. As a result, a one size fits all management style may no longer work effectively … furthermore, “management styles need to catch up” (1) with the changing times. This is just one example of the many generational phenomenons … Read more at george s may: With all of the aforementioned statements in mind, what trend most fascinates you and why? Submitted by Gary K. Pino, FMP (1) George S. May Intl. Co/Sponsored Article 01/31/2008 For more information on TRENDS, please refer to the website: www.trendwatching.com; in which leading consumer trend experts provide the 10 key trends to watch for in the Trend Report 2011.

Comments are closed.