End of the year stress anyone?

End of the year stress anyone?

By: Amanda Medlen As I was (and still am) deep in to end-of-the-year deadlines and meeting project expectations, all the while noticing I was due for a blog, wondered what on earth I was going to write about.  I decided to look into and search out exactly what I was dealing with at the moment. It seems that every year, no matter if it was a busy year or a slow year, there always seems to be an end of the year rush.  Why is that?  Well most of it can be attributed to projects/budgets needing to be spent by the end of the year and could also be for tax purposes.  Whatever the reason, all of this work coupled with all of our other outside activities (household responsibilities, busy family schedules, volunteer work, church, etc.) not to mention the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays…and in my case a few children’s birthday parties (love you Carson and Ryleigh!) can make for a VERY busy schedule. So what are some ways to combat some of this so called end-of-the-year stress?  In an article, from health24.com, that I stumbled across they list “10 end-of-the-year stress busters.”  Here is a sampling from that list:

  • Exercise
  • Face the dragon. “Avoiding a problem or agonizing about it in silence will cause adrenalin levels to climb. Dr Jan van Leeuwen, clinical and counseling psychologist, recommends that one redefines the problem. According to him, the solution to a problem lies in its meaning, its perception and its definition. On your own things could appear insoluble. A friend, or a counselor could give you a different perspective.”
  • Limit your caffeine intake. “Your body takes five hours to process caffeine, so if you have your first cup at 6am and the last at 11pm, your body is basically never caffeine-free. Caffeine, which is also present in tea, chocolate and some soda drinks, heightens your blood pressure and stops your adrenal glands from functioning at their best. In short, caffeine increases, not decreases, your stress levels.”
  • Eat healthy foods regularly. “Don’t skip meals, as this will cause your blood sugar to drop, worsening the effect of the blood glucose fluctuations you experience when stressed. Many people also resort to eating high-energy junk food or sweets in an attempt to counteract the sluggishness brought on by low blood sugar levels. Yogurt, fruit, fruit juice, vegetables, cottage cheese and high-fiber cereal are good things to eat. This will help to regulate your blood glucose levels.”
  • Get enough sleep. “Anyone who has ever been subjected to stress, knows that a good night’s sleep is often the first thing to go. Adults need eight hours of sleep a night – few get more than seven. When we are sleeping deeply, our breathing, our heart rate and blood pressure reach their lowest levels of the day. Our bodies need sleep to recharge and to aid the healing processes. Health24’s CyberShrink, Professor Michael Simpson, recommends avoiding alcohol, large meals at night and daytime napping. Drink a glass of warm milk before you go to bed, as milk contains an amino acid that is converted into a sleep-enhancing compound in the brain.”
  • Cut down your salt intake. “When sodium levels are raised for too long in your body, it disrupts the natural passage of nutrients to the body’s cells. Too much sodium over a prolonged period of time can raise your blood pressure and damage your heart muscle. If your blood pressure is too high, it can lead to your feeling constantly tired. And if you’re constantly feeling wiped out, you cannot cope with the stress in your life.”

I think this are great reminders and things to carry with us as we basically just deal with the ups and downs of life.  If you would like to read more about this you can find it here Happy 4th Quarter and good luck to everyone!  Don’t forget to have some fun in there somewhere!

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