Indiana – a Life Sciences Innovation State

Indiana – a Life Sciences Innovation State

By Janet H. Thomas, RID Indiana is building a life science industry that is competing with the traditionally accepted life science giants on the coasts. Two recent events provided public access to high details around this strategy. The Life Science Real Estate Summit and the IBJ Life Sciences Power Breakfast focused on the economic impact of Tech 16 and of the Life Sciences’ industry on the State. In 2014, Indiana generated $62 billion dollars in revenue from 1,695 companies employing 56,582 people and $9.9 billion in exported products, the 2nd highest in the US as determined by BioIntellex.  Tech 16 will be a planned community composed of research labs, office space, business incubators, co-working space, retail space, green space and apartments. The 20 year development plan is expected to attract $100 million from private investors by 2018 and $450 million in its first 10 years. The cornerstone of Tech 16 will be the Indiana Biosciences Research Institute, the first facility in the nation developed to fuel collaboration between local research universities and major institutions while attracting top research talent. Tech 16 is estimated to create 2,600 new jobs over a ten year period. 61% of these positions will be entry to middle skill level opportunities. 39% will be high skill jobs. However human capital is in short supply. Initiatives starting at the High School level engage young talent in the science and engineering professions. Community Health Network has aligned with Lawrence township schools and Project Lead the Way to develop STEM related curriculum that incorporates immersive learning or learning by doing. Franklin College revamped their curriculum to include science. In 2015 40% of the incoming freshmen planned to major in science making this their largest field of study. Franklin College believes combining STEM education with liberal arts and humanities increases critical thinking skills necessary to meet the needs of Hoosier life science employers, reports BioFutures magazine. Purdue University launched Discovery Park a collaborative cross-discipline think tank. They are also recruiting 60 faculty members in science, pharmacy, veterinary medicine, agriculture and health and human sciences to diversify their life sciences portfolio. The visionary efforts of the life science industry partners will encourage new business start-ups, new employment opportunities and a better work/life cycle for the people of Indiana. And the facilities to support this new collaboration will be critical to the success of the mission. At IDO we recognize the uniqueness of each client’s vision and empower our team to apply a unique blend of design talent and facility support service to move our world forward and improve the lives of others. Our specialty is designing mission critical environments that advance laboratory and clinical operations in the life sciences sector.  IDO looks forward to creating new partnerships to support the Indiana life science industry with their mission critical environments. Photos courtesy of mediaphotos at http://www.istockphoto.com/

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